The Witch-Cult in Western Europe: A Study in Anthropology (A Beginners Guide to Witchcraft)

July 15, 2016 - Comment

The Witch-Cult in Western Europe – Historical text first published Oxford at the Clarendon Press 1921 – The language is dated so be pre-warned this is for those with a true interest in witchcraft especially in Great Britain. Purports to be based on the records and confessions of ‘witches’ during their actual imprisonment and subsequent

The Witch-Cult in Western Europe – Historical text first published Oxford at the Clarendon Press 1921 – The language is dated so be pre-warned this is for those with a true interest in witchcraft especially in Great Britain. Purports to be based on the records and confessions of ‘witches’ during their actual imprisonment and subsequent torture, and trials. A reprint of the original 1921 title. Coven Rituals, Beliefs, Ceremonies, Marks and Rites.

Comments

simone says:

Please don’t tell me anyone actually takes this seriously! One of the groundbreaking works in the study of witchcraft, Margaret Murray’s _The Witch-Cult in Western Europe_ argues that accounts of the witch trials of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Britain provide evidence of a pre-Christian fertility cult persisting underground through the millennium of Christian domination, a cult wrongly persecuted by Christian authorities as Satanic. At the center of this cult was the worship of a god, and the cult itself Murray describes as worshipping “in…

J. W. Kennedy says:

Laborious This book is of interest mainly because HP Lovecraft put it on the bookshelves of occult scholars in his stories (alongside the “Necronomicon,” Frazer’s “Golden Bough,” and the “Unausprechlichen Kulten” of Von Juntz.) Readers will realize early on that this book was an inspiration to Lovecraft. Undoubtedly this is where he got the idea for the international Cthulhu cult in “Call of Cthulhu,” and he probably turned to it often as a reference to give an air of authenticity to witchcraft rituals…

Laurel Jenkins-Crowe says:

Holy crap. I give this two stars only because it’s historically important as a Wiccan/Neopagan foundation document. I don’t know how anyone ever took Murray’s “theory” seriously because it’s so incoherent. Having read this book twice, I’m still not sure exactly what she meant to prove; her “thesis” only becomes clear when filtered through other authors. Murray seems to have assumed that if she kept lobbing enough “witch trial evidence” at readers (especially if such documents were in foreign…

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