The Devil of Great Island: Witchcraft and Conflict in Early New England

December 7, 2016 - Comment

In 1682, ten years before the infamous Salem witch trials, the town of Great Island, New Hampshire, was plagued by mysterious events: strange, demonic noises; unexplainable movement of objects; and hundreds of stones that rained upon a local tavern and appeared at random inside its walls. Town residents blamed what they called “Lithobolia” or “the

In 1682, ten years before the infamous Salem witch trials, the town of Great Island, New Hampshire, was plagued by mysterious events: strange, demonic noises; unexplainable movement of objects; and hundreds of stones that rained upon a local tavern and appeared at random inside its walls. Town residents blamed what they called “Lithobolia” or “the stone-throwing devil.” In this lively account, Emerson Baker shows how witchcraft hysteria overtook one town and spawned copycat incidents elsewhere in New England, prefiguring the horrors of Salem. In the process, he illuminates a cross-section of colonial society and overturns many popular assumptions about witchcraft in the seventeenth century.

Comments

C. D. says:

History Buffs/Amateur Genealogists, Rejoice! Fascinating Stuff… Anyone even remotely interested in early New Hampshire history, genealogy, New England witch trials, or anyone with ancestors from coastal New Hampshire must read The Devil of Great Island, by Prof. Emerson Baker, PhD, of Salem State College. (No, I’m not related to him – that I know of, anyway – nor do I own stock in the publisher, sadly…) I was quite pleasantly surprised to read a historian’s account of 17th century life that was not bland and boring. Dr. Baker mentions at least 8 people…

Thao Mai Lisa Nhan says:

loves books

Write a comment

The owner of this website is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon properties including, but not limited to, amazon.com, endless.com, myhabit.com, smallparts.com, or amazonwireless.com.