Satanism and Witchcraft: The Classic Study of Medieval Superstition

January 26, 2016 - Comment

Long out of print, Jules Michelet’s classic study of medieval superstition has been reprinted in this edition to bring the general public’s attention to one of the truly great sociological works of modern times. Michelet brilliantly recreates the Europe of the Middle Ages, the centuries of fierce religious intolerance, the Inquisition and the auto-da-fe. He

Long out of print, Jules Michelet’s classic study of medieval superstition has been reprinted in this edition to bring the general public’s attention to one of the truly great sociological works of modern times.

Michelet brilliantly recreates the Europe of the Middle Ages, the centuries of fierce religious intolerance, the Inquisition and the auto-da-fe.

He depicts the feudal barons, the great manors, the fiefs and serfs… and the witches, hobgoblins and wizards of whom the masses lived in mortal fear.

Michelet draws flaming word pictures of the witch hunts, the Black Masses, the reign of Satan, and the weird rites of the damned. Here is the age of unbridled pleasure and sensuality, of luxury beyond imagination and squalor beyond endurance. Here is the time when a girl might be accused of witchcraft merely if she were young and pretty and did not survive the test of immersion in water or boiling oil. Here is the day of beatings, floggings, tortures and summary decapitations.

Encyclopedia Britannica called the book, “The most important work on medieval superstition yet written.” It is indeed one of the great works on the Age of Darkness.

Comments

Jeremy McGuire says:

High Drama in the Middle Ages I first read “Satanism and Witchcraft” in 1970, more than thirty years ago, and I still recall how enthralled I was by this incredibly dramatic and engaging history of the development of superstition in the Middle Ages. In fact, I used it as a source-book for one of my plays, “From All Things Evil,” many years later.Jules Michelet may not be the most accurate historian (in fact much fault has been found with his methods) but boy, does he ever tell a good story! Reading it again after…

A Constant Reader says:

What in the world was the last reviewer taking? Satan as Hero? Michelet a Satanist? The book is the basis for a group of Michelet Satanists? Oh for pete’s sake. What some people think is “real” continues to astound me, and you’d think after all these years my astounder would have been pretty much astounded out. But no. Once again, someone expresses a belief so unfounded and so, well, stupid, there I go, getting astounded again. Too bad they wrote it yonks ago. Chances are they won’t be reading this. In any case, this book, of which…

Anonymous says:

When I first picked this book up to read, I actually wondered if this were a scholarly treatise. It is, but the author does not have many real references or bibliographical citations. You will, however, shed tears as he describes – from his very hear of hearts – the abominable story behind the burning of tens of thousands of innocent women and men. I * nearly * put this book down but pursued it to the end and actually found it to be my favorite book of all the ones I ordered to study…

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