Origins of Modern Witchcraft: The Evolution of a World Religion

November 24, 2015 - Comment

Christianity began at the start of the common era. Judaism began a few thousand years before that. Religion in Egypt and Sumer go maybe a few thousand years before that. But what came before? Most people don’t know that civilization began at Sind, a fertile area in modern Pakistan. Their ancient religion, the worship of

Christianity began at the start of the common era. Judaism began a few thousand years before that. Religion in Egypt and Sumer go maybe a few thousand years before that.
But what came before? Most people don’t know that civilization began at Sind, a fertile area in modern Pakistan. Their ancient religion, the worship of Shiva and Shakti, is the oldest religion known. It spread throughout the world and it, reactions to it, or a combination of the two are the basis for all religion in the world today.
Does this sound surprising? Historian and former history teacher Ann Moura has been able to trace civilization and religion into the past by over 100,000 years! She presents this information in Origins of Modern Witchcraft.
The author reveals that virtually every aspect of modern Witchcraft can be traced back to the ancient Sind religion. Much of the same can be found in modern Hinduism, but Hinduism has had many Vedic ideas – including orthodoxy and caste – added to the original faith.
Even so, the notion of the triple goddess (a Maiden, Mother, and Crone) comes straight from the older religion. The idea of the God being horned is derived from an image of Shiva. Many of the mythic images we associate with Greece and Rome originally came from the Sind religion.
But this goes beyond Wicca to other religions. You’ll see that Christ was a version of Krishna and “original sin” was a development of those who hated the original religion. It means that something was evil because it originally came from Sind.
Controversial? You bet! This book is destined to be one of the most controversial books published this or any other year! But the author has listed all of her sources. Now is your chance to read the evidence for yourself and discover the real ancient sources for your beliefs. Get your copy today!

Comments

Barbara A. Fisher says:

Poorly researched, illogical “theorizing” This is one of the most poorly researched books on the subject of the origins of modern Witchcraft I have ever read in my entire twenty plus years as a practicing Witch. Moura calls her ideas a “theory,” however, I would consider them to be at best, a weak hypothesis. A theory must be supported at least in part by factual evidence. Facts are not broadly evident in this work.For example, this author’s explanation as to why the Holocaust occurred fly in the face of all of the…

A Customer says:

A “Feel Good” Book Perhaps … but NOT Good History! A lot of Pagans have, it would seem, a desperate, deep-down need to “legitimize” their religion, especially in the face of frequent attacks by fundamentalist Christians. Ann Moura has delivered a book that meets that need. What Pagan, after all, would not feel good to learn that we are not only “the Old Religion,” but in fact THE Old Religion…and everyone knows “older is better”, right? She claims that “European Witchcraft hearkens back to the worship…

happydogpotatohead says:

Well-intentioned but confusing and ahistorical I hoped for a good exposition on the history of Paganism and Witchcraft. Instead, I got a book that was very typical of what Llewellyn is releasing these days. Ms. Moura’s idyllic view of the Indus Valley civilizations is not accurate, and does not agree with the archaeological evidence. It isn’t possible, from the archaeological evidence, to determine exactly who or what the Mohenjo-Daro civilization worshipped or believed, nor is it possible to say how they lived. In fact, one structure…

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