Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft

June 15, 2013 - Comment

This anthology is a thorough introduction to classic literature for those who have not yet experienced these literary masterworks. For those who have known and loved these works in the past, this is an invitation to reunite with old friends in a fresh new format. From Shakespeare s finesse to Oscar Wilde s wit, this

This anthology is a thorough introduction to classic literature for those who have not yet experienced these literary masterworks. For those who have known and loved these works in the past, this is an invitation to reunite with old friends in a fresh new format. From Shakespeare s finesse to Oscar Wilde s wit, this unique collection brings together works as diverse and influential as The Pilgrim s Progress and Othello. As an anthology that invites readers to immerse themselves in the masterpieces of the literary giants, it is must-have addition to any library.

Comments

J. Mccormick says:

An excellent book for Scully OR Tabitha This is a reprint of a book published in the 1830’s by Sir Walter Scott as a favor to his son-in-law. Scott researches folklore, superstition, and witchcraft (through folklore, trial records, and previous scholars) in depth to give the reader a comprehensive body of knowledge. The modern reader will find more here than she ever knew. Countless court cases from all of Europe and especially Scotland (where the author resided) and England are presented. Scott writes from the point of view that he lives in a scientific age and that the possibility of these occurances is absurd, but, because he gives you all of the information from which he derives his opinion, you can make your own. Personally, I’m a fanciful person and would like to believe in ghosts and such, but in most of the cases he has plausible explanations for their being impossible (especially pertaining to witchcraft). Interesting to note, in not one of the cases of witchcraft did any of the accused, or the accusers mention…

S. Strider says:

A masterful work from 1900 Oddly enough, this book talks more about Faeries and defends many accused of witchcraft of influence by the fair folk upon the glens and moors.

M. DeKalb says:

Mostly Relating to Witch-Hunting. Published two years before Scott’s death in 1832, this work is practically a meta-analysis of stories of witch-trials and persecutions mostly based in Europe with a few stories detailing the supporting or contrasting events as seen in Scandinavian countries and the Americas. Scott takes the position that the human mind is a fragile thing, imagination creates all kinds of scary things and if those culpable of their crimes were to behave rationally this wouldn’t have, and shouldn’t have happened. Succinctly – “every generation of the human race must swallow a certain measure of nonsense.”Filled with interesting terminology it can be a fairly taxing read, as Scott seems to have a proclivity to be long winded and seldom winds a story down in timely fashion. He also doesn’t fear the use of incredibly superfluous detailing of the events and persons involved.Bridging the gap, Scott covers very well the transition from tribalism, mythology and lore to the intervention…

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