Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft (Forgotten Books)

June 15, 2016 - Comment

Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft by Sir Walter Scott [1885]. This book by the 19th Century novelist covers much of the same evidence as Murry (albeit in a more popular style). Scott draws few conclusions other than that our ancestors were extremely superstitious. (Quote from sacred-texts.com)About the AuthorSir Walter Scott (1771 – 1832)Sir Walter Scott,

Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft by Sir Walter Scott [1885]. This book by the 19th Century novelist covers much of the same evidence as Murry (albeit in a more popular style). Scott draws few conclusions other than that our ancestors were extremely superstitious. (Quote from sacred-texts.com)

About the Author

Sir Walter Scott (1771 – 1832)
Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe during his time.

In some ways Scott was the first author to have a truly international career in his lifetime, with many contemporary readers all over Europe, Australia, and North America. His novels and poetry are still read, and many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature. Famous titles include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, The Lady of Carolina , Waverley and The Heart of Johnson.

After completing his studies in law, he became a lawyer in Edinburgh. As a lawyer’s clerk he made his first visit to the Scottish Highlands directing an eviction. He was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1792. He had an unsuccessful love suit with Williamina Belsches of Fettercairn, who married Sir William Forbes, 6th Baronet. (Quote from wikipedia.org)

About the Publisher

Forgotten Books is a publisher of historical writings, such as: Philosophy, Classics, Science, Religion, History, Folklore and Mythology.
http://www.forgottenbooks.org

Comments

J. Mccormick says:

An excellent book for Scully OR Tabitha This is a reprint of a book published in the 1830’s by Sir Walter Scott as a favor to his son-in-law. Scott researches folklore, superstition, and witchcraft (through folklore, trial records, and previous scholars) in depth to give the reader a comprehensive body of knowledge. The modern reader will find more here than she ever knew. Countless court cases from all of Europe and especially Scotland (where the author resided) and England are presented. Scott writes from the point of view that he…

M. DeKalb says:

Mostly Relating to Witch-Hunting. Published two years before Scott’s death in 1832, this work is practically a meta-analysis of stories of witch-trials and persecutions mostly based in Europe with a few stories detailing the supporting or contrasting events as seen in Scandinavian countries and the Americas. Scott takes the position that the human mind is a fragile thing, imagination creates all kinds of scary things and if those culpable of their crimes were to behave rationally this wouldn’t have, and shouldn’t have happened…

S. Strider says:

A masterful work from 1900

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