Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft

October 6, 2015 - Comment

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

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Comments

J. Mccormick says:

An excellent book for Scully OR Tabitha This is a reprint of a book published in the 1830’s by Sir Walter Scott as a favor to his son-in-law. Scott researches folklore, superstition, and witchcraft (through folklore, trial records, and previous scholars) in depth to give the reader a comprehensive body of knowledge. The modern reader will find more here than she ever knew. Countless court cases from all of Europe and especially Scotland (where the author resided) and England are presented. Scott writes from the point of view that he…

S. Strider says:

A masterful work from 1900 0

M. DeKalb says:

Mostly Relating to Witch-Hunting. Published two years before Scott’s death in 1832, this work is practically a meta-analysis of stories of witch-trials and persecutions mostly based in Europe with a few stories detailing the supporting or contrasting events as seen in Scandinavian countries and the Americas. Scott takes the position that the human mind is a fragile thing, imagination creates all kinds of scary things and if those culpable of their crimes were to behave rationally this wouldn’t have, and shouldn’t have happened…

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