A History of Witchcraft in England From 1558 to 1718

June 16, 2016 - Comment

“Admirable and extremely interesting….An important and valuable contribution to our knowledge of this subject. The work treats of two closely related topics, a narrative of the witch trials with their attendant circumstances during this period and a discussion of contemporary opinion about witchcraft. It was first begun as an essay submitted at Yale University in

“Admirable and extremely interesting….An important and valuable contribution to our knowledge of this subject. The work treats of two closely related topics, a narrative of the witch trials with their attendant circumstances during this period and a discussion of contemporary opinion about witchcraft. It was first begun as an essay submitted at Yale University in partial requirement for the doctorate of philosophy, then it was awarded by the American Historical Association the Adams Prize in European history. As now published it has received the scholarly supervision of Professor George L. Burr of Cornell. This long and careful evolution should lend weight to the author’s conclusions and be considered as one of the many evidences of his painstaking scholarship.” -The South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 11, 1912

CONTENTS. Preface CHAPTER I. The Beginnings of English Witchcraft CHAPTER II. Witchcraft under Elizabeth CHAPTER III. Reginald Scot 7 CHAPTER IV. The Exorcists CHAPTER V. James I and Witchcraft CHAPTER VI. Notable Jacobean Cases CHAPTER VII. The Lancashire Witches and Charles I CHAPTER VIII. Matthew Hopkins CHAPTER IX. Witchcraft during the Commonwealth and Protectorate CHAPTER X. The Literature of Witchcraft from 1603 to 1660 CHAPTER XI. Witchcraft under Charles II and James II CHAPTER XII. Glanvill and Webster and the Literary War over Witchcraft, 1660-1688 CHAPTER XIII. The Final Decline CHAPTER XIV. The Close of the Literary Controversy Appendices A. Pamphlet Literature B. List of Persons Sentenced to Death for Witchcraft during the Reign of James I C. List of Cases of Witchcraft, 1558-1717, with References to Sources and Literature

Comments

Anthony Spadaro says:

Well researched and written but too repetitive for me I bought This book in the free kindle edition – I’ll read almost anything so long as it is well written and inexpensive.For those looking to research the subject this is a treasure trove of accurate information about Witch prosecutions in England during the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. It is about England – only. There are only a few paragraphs about the Salem trials and I don’t remember any names coming up in that section – certainly no family histories. For me the multitude of…

Darcia Helle says:

Great For Research This book is more a history of witchcraft trials and outcomes in England, rather than of witchcraft itself. The writing is dry bordering on dull, which is to be expected of a textbook from the period in which this one was written. It’s factual accounts, with no summation or interjection from the author.I’ve read a lot about the Salem witch trials that took place here in the US, but I had little knowledge about the events in England that precipitated Salem. I found the history…

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